Posts Tagged distillery

Woodford Reserve Releases Limited Edition Bourbon Featuring Specially-Aged Barrels

October 27, 2009, Louisville, Ky. – Woodford Reserve announces the latest extension of its acclaimed Master’s Collection which will be released on November 1. Called ‘Seasoned Oak Finish,’ it is the fourth in the series of limited edition bottlings and continues Woodford Reserve’s tradition of crafting rare whiskeys that extend the category in bold new directions.

Barrels play a key role in producing bourbon, with approximately 70 percent of the spirit’s wrmc-seasoned-oak-bottle-shot-187x300flavor and aroma and all of its color provided by the oak barrel. Woodford Reserve’s new offering, Seasoned Oak Finish, features bourbon finish-aged in unique barrels crafted with wood that has been seasoned longer than any previously used in the industry.

“Of all the distillers in our industry, we are the only bourbon company that crafts its own barrels, giving us unique knowledge and control of the process,” said Woodford Reserve Master Distiller Chris Morris. “As the rough oak staves are exposed to seasonal weather changes and subsequently dried, this natural cycle develops a new range of flavors in the wood.”

This seasoning progression changes the wood by reducing tannins and ultimately creates a new range of flavor compounds. The staves for most bourbon barrels are seasoned for three to five months; however, Seasoned Oak Finish combines fully-matured Woodford Reserve with barrels crafted from wood that has been exposed to the outdoors for three to five years — the longest seasoning known in the bourbon industry.

“By ‘finish aging’ Woodford Reserve in barrels that have been crafted from oak and seasoned for several years, we created a bourbon unlike any other in the industry. It’s the most robust bourbon we have ever made,” said Wayne Rose, brand director for Woodford Reserve. “This special Master’s Collection release emboldens Woodford Reserve with ‘extra-aged’ oak character resulting in a new and complex flavor profile.”

Seasoned Oak Finish is the fourth in the Woodford Reserve Master’s Collection series following the Four Grain, Sonoma-Cutrer Finish and Sweet Mash products. Released periodically at the master distiller’s discretion, the Master’s Collection whiskeys are extremely limited in quantity and bottled only once in a proprietary package inspired by the copper pot stills of The Woodford Reserve Distillery.

The inspiration for the Master’s Collection is rooted in the rich history and tradition of what is today known as The Woodford Reserve Distillery. In the mid-1800s distillery owner Oscar Pepper and Master Distiller James Crow studied and recommended use of key processes like sour mashing and charred barrel maturation at the historic Woodford County distillery. These practices are still maintained in the bourbon industry and, today, the distillery receives more than 80,000 visitors annually and is the only one in America to triple-distill bourbon in copper pot stills.

Woodford Reserve Seasoned Oak Finish will be sold in 44 U.S. markets, and a limited quantity will be available in Canada, the United Kingdom, Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, New Zealand and Australia. Each bottle is individually hand-numbered and presented at 100.4 proof. Available in major metro markets, only 1,337 cases are available with a suggested retail price of $89.99 for a 750ml bottle.

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Woodford Reserve is one of the fine spirits produced and marketed by Brown-Forman

Corporation, a producer and marketer of fine quality beverage alcohol brands, including Jack Daniel’s, Southern Comfort, Finlandia, Fetzer, Korbel, Tequila Herradura, Sonoma-Cutrer, Chambord, Tuaca, and Bonterra. Please enjoy your bourbon responsibly. For more information on Woodford Reserve, visit www.woodfordreserve.com.

Woodford Reserve Distiller’s Select Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, 45.2% Alc. by Vol., The Woodford Reserve Distillery, Versailles, KY ©2009.

Tasting Notes for Woodford Reserve Seasoned Oak Finish

Color:  Rich mahogany.

Aroma:  Deep, complex and subtly sweet; hints of cinnamon, clove, rich caramel and pipe  tobacco, with a nutty oak character.

Taste:   Full-flavored and robust oak with layers of anise, dark berries and cherry fruit,  warming cinnamon and clove spice notes, all with a caramel nut sauce.

Finish: Velvety and long with a hint of crisp dryness.

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Brown-Forman Changes Name of Blue Grass Cooperage, Open for Tours

B-F Cooperage BarrelLouisville, KY, July, 7, 2009 – Brown-Forman announced today it is opening the Brown-Forman Cooperage to the public for tours for the first time in its history. The Cooperage will also be re-named from Blue Grass Cooperage to Brown-Forman Cooperage to honor the parent company which continues the rich tradition of crafting barrels to this day.

The Brown-Forman Cooperage is where barrels are hand-crafted for the aging of spirits such as Jack Daniel’s, Woodford Reserve, Old Forester, Early Times, Canadian Mist, El Jimador and Herradura. Brown-Forman is the only spirits company in the world to make its own barrels, which are created from American white oak.

All Brown-Forman Cooperage tours must be setup in advance through Mint Julep Tours by calling (502) 583-1433 or visiting www.mintjuleptours.com. Also available through Mint Julep Tours is the “All Woodford, All Day Tour” which will include transportation to both the Brown-Forman Cooperage and Woodford Reserve Distillery, a tour guide host, admission to both venues and lunch.

With the opening of the Brown-Forman Cooperage for tours, the general public will have a chance to see the lumber yard, view the artful selection of staves and barrel assembly, charring and the finishing section. Visitors can also witness the historic art of barrel raising, powerful sounds and the smell of burning oak which are present every day at the Cooperage.

“The aromatic smells are the best part of the tour,” said Brown-Forman Master Distiller Chris Morris. “By toasting and charring these barrels, we activate natural flavors and aromas in the wood which give our spirits such distinct tastes.”

Brown-Forman founded the Cooperage in 1945, and while a great deal of technology has been added to enable the production of more than 1,500 barrels per day, a trip inside is a step back in time.

“We know oak barrels were introduced to the world by the Romans more than 2,000 years ago,” added Morris. “The Romans obviously didn’t have the technology we have available today, but we are still following the same processes they followed back then.”

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Buffalo Trace Distillery Hosts The Great Buffalo Chase 5K Race

Great Buffalo ChaseFRANKLIN COUNTY, – The Annual Great Buffalo Chase will be July 4th beginning 8 a.m. This year’s race will start on distillery grounds and wind through historic aging warehouses, production facilities and lots of beautiful scenery before finishing up at the gift shop. T-shirts and gift bags will be given to all runners. Registration begins at 7 a.m. in front of the Buffalo Trace Gift Shop the day of the race. Proceeds from the race will again go towards funding VFW Post 4075’s Annual Fourth of July fireworks show. Post 4075 has sponsored the fireworks show in Franklin County for over 40 years. Registration forms are available at Buffalo Trace Distillery as well as at numerous Frankfort-area locations. Runners can also obtain a form by contacting Nancy Gum at ngum@buffalotrace.com.

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Celebrate July 4th with America’s Only Native Spirit

trailFRANKFORT, Ky. – Several of Kentucky’s signature bourbon distilleries will be open on Saturday, July 4th so you can celebrate the birth of our nation with America’s official native spirit.

“The rich tradition of Kentucky bourbon is intertwined with our nation’s storied past,” said Eric Gregory, president of the Kentucky Distillers’ Association. “It’s fueled the economy of Kentucky and played a vital role in the culture, heritage and history of America.”

In fact, George Washington had the largest whiskey distillery in the 18th century, Gregory said.

Visitors can learn more about Kentucky bourbon along the famous Kentucky Bourbon Trail®. Several of the Trail’s eight legendary distilleries are open during this holiday weekend. All hours are Eastern Standard Time:

Buffalo Trace, Frankfort – open Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., closed Sunday.

Four Roses, Lawrenceburg – open Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., last tour at 3:00 p.m., closed Sunday.

Heaven Hill, Bardstown – open Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday noon to 4 p.m.

Jim Beam, Clermont – open Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Sunday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Maker’s Mark, Loretto – open Friday and Saturday, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Sunday tours 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 p.m.

Tom Moore, Bardstown – Closed for tours Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Wild Turkey, Lawrenceburg – Tours Friday at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Gift shop will be open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Closed on Saturday and Sunday.

Woodford Reserve, Versailles – Tours Friday at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. Closed Saturday. Tours on Sunday at 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Visit www.kybourbontrail.com for more information on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail.

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Buffalo Trace Distillery Acquires E.H. Taylor Bourbon

FRANKLIN COUNTY, Ky., June 23 /PRNewswire/ — E.H. Taylor is coming back to the distillery where it all began. Buffalo Trace Distillery, located in Frankfort, KY, has purchased the Old Taylor Bourbon label and barrel inventory from Beam Global Spirits & Wine, Inc., maker of Jim Beam Bourbon.

“We are ecstatic about this transaction,” said Mark Brown, president and CEO of Buffalo Trace Distillery. “Part of our family is returning and we are buffalo_tracethrilled to welcome home a true bourbon whiskey pioneer.”

Taylor, the great-nephew of President Zachary Taylor, briefly lived with his great-uncle after the death of his parents. He later moved to Kentucky where he was adopted by his uncle, Col. E.H. Taylor, Sr. Following in his uncle’s footsteps, Taylor went on to be a leader in the Frankfort community. He served as mayor from 1871-1887 as well as a local state representative to the Kentucky General Assembly and a member of the State Senate.

Taylor’s link to Buffalo Trace dates back to 1870 when he first purchased the distillery and took on the daunting task of modernization. He later named the distillery O.F.C. (Old Fire Copper) and continued to invest large sums of money, making it a leader in the industry.

Taylor over-extended himself financially in an effort to use the most modern equipment to make the finest bourbon whiskey available. The end result of Taylor’s financial difficulties was the sale of O.F.C. to George T. Stagg. However, even with Taylor out of the picture, the new owner moved forward using his name, as it was synonymous with fine bourbon whiskey. The award-winning Buffalo Trace Distillery is proud to carry on the legacy of this great pioneer.

“It’s an exciting, new opportunity for us,” said Harlen Wheatley, master distiller. “We are very proud of the bourbon we produce at Buffalo Trace and to be able to carry on what E.H. Taylor started more than a century ago is a real honor.”

For more information about Buffalo Trace Distillery please visit www.buffalotrace.com. To learn more about the other award-winning bourbons of Buffalo Trace please go to www.greatbourbon.com.

About Buffalo Trace

Buffalo Trace Distillery is a family-owned company based in Franklin County, Kentucky. The distillery’s rich distilling tradition dates back to 1787 and has included such legends as E.H. Taylor, Jr., George T. Stagg, Albert B. Blanton, Orville Schupp, and Elmer T. Lee. Buffalo Trace is a fully operational distillery producing bourbon, rye and vodka on site and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Buffalo Trace has won seven distillery titles since 2000 from such notable publications as Whisky Magazine, Malt Advocate Magazine and Wine Enthusiast Magazine. Buffalo Trace has also garnered more than 170 awards for its wide range of premium whiskies. The distillery is part of the Sazerac family of companies, which has operations in New Orleans, Louisiana; Franklin County, Bardstown and Owensboro, Kentucky; Fredericksburg, Virginia and Baltimore, Maryland.

SOURCE Buffalo Trace Distillery

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Four Roses Bourbon Seminar For MMC Members

Dear Mellow Moments Club Member,Mellow Moments Club

We would like to invite you to join Master Distiller, Jim Rutledge for a Bourbon Seminar at Four Roses Distillery on Tuesday, June 9th.  Jim will give a presentation on the Bourbon making process, and explain how we make Four Roses Bourbons always smooth and always mellow.  After the presentation there will be a walking tour of the distillery and then move to the sensory lab for a tasting of Four Roses Bourbon and other Bourbons currently on the market.  The evening will finish with a social hour in which you may mingle with other Mellow Moments Club members and Four Roses staff.

Due to our seating capacity the Bourbon Seminar with Jim is limited, priority will be given to members who have not attended in the past.  The seminar will be held from 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm.  At 8:00 pm the social hour begins.  This will be a time for members to talk with Jim and meet new friends.

To make a reservation for a member and one guest for the seminar please RSVP by Monday, June 1.

Please email Julie_Crittenden@fourroses.biz or call 1-877-FOUROSE for reservations or with any questions you may have regarding this event.  Must be 21 to attend and this event is offered at no charge.

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Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail To Serve As Location For Relay

Road running’s newest addition to its long relay category is the Bourbon Chase in Kentucky, October 9 and 10, 2009. This overnight relay will see 150 teams of 12 runners (or six in the ultra category) race on over 200 miles of scenic back roads and byways connecting Kentucky’s bourbon distillers along its historic Bourbon Trail. This race expects to see the most people travel the Bourbon Trail in a two-day period ever.

Bourbon and Kentucky
Kentucky and bourbon go hand in hand as Kentucky provides 95 percent of the world’s bourbon. The state’s Bourbon Trail connects seven of the state’s more prominent bourbon distillers. Bourbon is a unique spirit, different from whisky in that it must have at least 50 percent corn, at least 17 percent rye, and be aged in new charred white oak barrels. Early settlers to the area included many Scotch or Irish immigrants and their descendants, and they brought with them to America their whiskey-making skills. Corn was a native crop growing abundantly in Kentucky, and there was also seemingly unlimited supply of clean, calcium-filled, iron-free water that had been distilling for millions of years in the state’s limestone beds; both of these are critical components of the whiskey-making process. Farmers new to the area soon began distilling their surplus corn using the limestone water, producing a new kind of whiskey. When farmers began shipping their bourbon down the Mississippi River to New Orleans they used new barrels made from white oak—which are native to the state—as shipping containers; these oak barrels ‘mellowed’ the whiskey, further setting this unique kind of whiskey apart from others. Later, it became customary for the distillers to use barrels that had been charred on the inside; this process provided the whiskey with a smoother taste and its distinctive amber color. During the early 1800s, corn whiskey produced in other parts of central Kentucky finally came to be known as bourbon whiskey.

The Bourbon Chase Coursebourbon_chase_logo
This race will showcase the best of Kentucky in the autumn months. Runners will begin at the Jim Beam Distillery American Outpost & Homestead in Clermont, Kentucky, and continue on to Bardstown, the Bourbon Capital of the World. In the charming city of Bardstown, runners will run through the grounds of Heaven Hill, the largest family-owned distillery in the world, and then head to the charming town of Loretto, home to the historic and beautiful Maker’s Mark distillery. From Loretto the course runs through Lebanon, where most of the state’s bourbon barrels are made. The course then passes through and along some of the state’s Kentucky’s most historic areas, including Perryville Battlefield, the site of a Civil War battle, and Stanford, the second oldest city in Kentucky. Runners will then head north and pass through Danville, the site where the state’s first constitution was written, and Harrodsburg, which was established as Fort Harrod in 1774 and was the first permanent settlement west of the Alleghenies.

The course then takes runners back into distillery country, starting with Four Roses and Wild Turkey, both in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. Runners will then cross the Tyrone Bridge, several hundred feet above the Kentucky River, in Anderson County and enter the official gateway to Horse Country. This section of the course, heading toward Woodford Reserve, will undoubtedly serve as the most stunning because of its rolling bluegrass countryside and picturesque horse farms.

trailContinuing north, runners will run through Frankfort—the state’s capital. Here runners will pass the abandoned castle of the Old Taylor Distillery, once a tourist destination itself for Washington and Kentucky’s elite. The course then takes runners through historic downtown Frankfort where they will run by the ‘old’ (1830) and new (1910) Capitol buildings, the Governor’s Mansion, and of course, the Buffalo Trace Distillery, one of only four distilleries permitted by the federal government to continue producing through prohibition for ‘medicinal’ purposes.

Runners will leave Frankfort heading east, and pass through Midway, home of Midway College, one of the state’s leading colleges focusing on equine professions. As runners wind their way out of Midway and down the scenic back roads of the Bluegrass Region, the course will run near Keeneland, a beautiful track and thoroughbred sales complex, which is home to several Kentucky Derby and Breeders’ Cups prep races, most notable of which is the Blue Grass Stakes. Runners will then head for the finish line in downtown Lexington, near the storied Rupp Arena. The celebration will include live music, food, and of course, bourbon. All runners will receive a Bourbon Chase medal and shirt.

The Finish Line
Lexington calls itself the Horse Capital of the World, and there are many good reasons why. In addition to Keeneland, Lexington is also home to the Kentucky Horse Park, the world’s only equine educational park, recreation area, and museum. The Kentucky Horse Park is also where many of the world’s greatest racing thoroughbreds come to retire. Also boosting Lexington’s claim as Horse Capital of the World is its role of host of the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, which will feature more than 50 breeds on 1,200 rolling Bluegrass acres.

Race Details
For this inaugural Bourbon Chase, start times will be determined based on each team’s average pace. The first teams will begin on October 9 at 9:00 am and waves of teams will leave every 15 minutes. Each team member will runner three legs of the 36-leg race; the length of each leg will vary but will be no shorter than 3.8 miles and no longer than 8.2 miles. All teams will be expected to finish the course in under a pace of 11 minutes per mile. Further, all runners must be 21 to participate in this libations-themed race.

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Texas Bourbon Coming From Garrison Brothers Distillery In 2011

By John Griffin – Express-News Staff Writer

HYE — This town is a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it dot on the map between Fredericksburg and Johnson City. But in a few years’ time, it could be known to spirit lovers as the birthplace of Texas bourbon.

For the past 19 months, Dan Garrison has been distilling the state’s first bourbon from a mix of organic corn, malt and soft red winter wheat. More than 150 filled and sealed barrels of what will be bottled as Garrison Brothers Distillery Bourbon are aging on his 68-acre lot, a couple of miles off U.S. 290.

At this point, no signs mark the place, but those who find their way to the plant will more than likely encounter Garrison there, working with his staff of two to get as much alcohol in barrels as they can.GB Barrel

By law, bourbon must be aged for at least two years before it can be bottled and labeled bourbon. It must also be made from at least 51 percent corn and aged in newly charred oak barrels. Other rules govern the proof at which it is distilled and bottled, but the most important factor to the consumer is nothing can be added to it except water. In other words, no dyes giving it the right caramel color or flavor additives to achieve the right balance.

Through the years, bourbon has been largely distilled in Kentucky, where such powerhouses as Maker’s Mark, Booker’s, Knob Creek and Woodford Reserve are crafted.

Garrison hopes to place his bourbon alongside those greats, though he doesn’t expect to have his first bottles for sale until his “fingers-crossed launch date” of 2011.

“You have to have a lot of patience to get into the bourbon business,” he says.

You also have to have a lot of passion, which Garrison has in abundance. As he works his way through the plant, complex chemical processes become lucid, at least for a moment, as he describes everything from the various waters he uses (softened water for boiling, rainwater for bottling, reverse osmosis water for fining, raw water for flavor) to the cooking of the corn and barley malt, the actions of barley enzymes and yeasts, and the temperatures and proofs that must be marked as the steam goes through the still.

What is important to remember is that Garrison uses Yellow Dent corn, which has “the highest fermentable sugar content” of any corn on the market, he says. Sweetness counts in bourbon, which is known for its caramel and butterscotch flavors as well as its fruitiness.

Garrison’s current formula is to use 74 percent corn, mixed with 15 percent soft red winter wheat and the rest malt.

Garrison went into making spirits after frustrating experiences in the tech industry. He credits his wife with the decision: “My wife said, ‘You drink so much of it, maybe you should make bourbon.’”

Getting the distillery launched hasn’t been easy. Though Garrison visited Kentucky and met with master distillers like David Pickerell from Maker’s Mark, it took 60 or so attempts to get the recipe right. But once he discovered when to add the malted barley, the process became easier.

The biggest blow was that he split with his original partner in a bitter breakup. He’s borrowed from family and friends to keep going. And he credits his father and brother, who “kicked me in the butt and told me not to feel so sorry for myself,” he says.

He repaid their faith by naming the distillery after the family.

Though the first bottles have yet to be bottled, Garrison has attracted the attention of devoted bourbon fans from across the country, many of whom have wanted to see the plant where Texas’ first bourbon is being distilled, even if they can’t have a sample.

“All of a sudden, people started flocking here,” he says. “I get five or six visitors a week.” For a private tour of the distillery, call (512) 302-0608.

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Link to original story from My SA Life.

Garrison Brothers Distillery

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